Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, Redemptorists, SACRED and IMMACULATE HEARTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 18 November – Reparation for outrages against the Most Blessed Sacrament – St Alphonsus Liguori

Sunday Reflection – 18 November

Reparation for outrages against the Most Blessed Sacrament

 St Alphonsus Liguori (1696-1787) Doctor of the Church

Meditate the following text written by Saint Alphonsus Maria and translated by Norman J. Muckermann, CSsR.    It is astonishingly relevant to the need for reparation, when one considers the current proliferation of so many outrages against the Most Blessed Sacrament.

The Sorrowful Heart of Jesus
It is impossible for us to appreciate how greatly afflicted the Heart of Jesus was for love of us and at the same time not be filled with pity for Him. . . . The principal sorrow affecting the Heart of Jesus was not so much knowing the torments and insults His enemies were preparing for Him.   Rather, it was seeing how ready we would be to reject His immense love.

Desecrations of the Sacred Host
Jesus distinctly saw all the sins which we would commit even after His sufferings, even after His bitter and ignominious death on the cross.   He foresaw, too, the insults which sinners would offer His Sacred Heart which He would leave on earth in the Most Holy Sacrament as proof of His love.   These insults are almost too horrible to mention:  people trampling the sacred hosts underfoot, throwing them into gutters or piles of refuse and even using them to worship the devil himself!

The Pledge of His Love
Even the knowledge that these and other defamations would happen did not prevent Jesus from giving us this great pledge of His love, the Holy Eucharist.   Jesus has an infinite hatred for sin, yet it seems that His great love for us even overcomes this bitterness.   Because of His love, He allows these sacrileges to happen in order not to deprive us of this Divine Food.   Should not this alone suffice to make us love a Heart that has loved us so much?

Jesus Forsaken on the Altar
What more could Jesus do to deserve our love?   Is our ingratitude so great that we will still leave Jesus forsaken on the altar, as so many are wont to do?   Rather, should we not unite ourselves to those few who gather to praise Him and acknowledge His divine presence?   Should we not melt with love, as do the candles which adorn the altars where the Holy Sacrament is preserved?   There the Sacred Heart remains burning with love for us.   Shall we not in turn burn with love for Jesus?”should we not melt with love - st alphonsus -18 nov 2018 sunday reflection

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Posted in CATHOLIC Quotes, MORNING Prayers, Pope BENEDICT XVI, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, QUOTES on UNITY, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 11 November – “Standing before the Lord” – Pope Benedict XVI

Sunday Reflection – 11 November

“Standing before the Lord” (Excerpt)

Pope Benedict XVI

In the Church of former times, the word for this was statio. …From the very beginning, when Christianity spread throughout the world, its heralds laid the greatest importance on there being only one bishop and only one altar in every town.   This was meant to express the unity of the one Lord, who unites us all in His embrace from the Cross, an embrace that goes beyond the frontiers drawn by earthly life and forms us into one body. And this, of course, is the innermost meaning of the Eucharist, that, by receiving the one bread, we actually enter into this one centre and thus become a living organism, the one body of the Lord.
The Eucharist is not a private matter among friends, taking place in a club of like-minded people where congenial spirits meet together.   On the contrary, just as the Lord allowed Himself to be crucified publicly outside the city walls, stretching out His hands to all, the Eucharist is the public worship celebrated by all, whom the Lord calls….
It was fundamental to the Eucharist in the Mediterranean world, which first saw the growth of Christianity, that the aristocrat who had found his way to Christianity should sit down with the Corinthian dock-worker, the miserable slave who, according to Roman law, was not even held to be a human being and was dealt with as chattel.   It is of the very nature of the Eucharist, that the philosopher should sit beside the illiterate man, the converted prostitute and the converted tax-collector beside the ascetic who has found his way to Jesus Christ.
In Rome, for instance, even during the era of persecution, the titular churches came into being as predecessors of the later parishes…..the Eucharist continued to unite people who would otherwise not mix.   Consequently, the statio was introduced – here, particularly during Lent, the Pope, as the single Bishop of Rome, goes among the individual titular churches and celebrates the liturgy for the whole city of Rome.
Christians gather together and go to church together, thus, in the individual churches, the whole Church is visible and is manifest at the individual level.
The Lord gathers us together and opens us so that we can accept one another and belong to one another, so that, in standing side by side with Him, we can learn once again to stand together with one another. ….What binds us together is not the private interest of this or that group but the interest which God takes in us.   And we can calmly and confidently, entrust all our interests to Him.   We commit ourselves to the Lord.   And the more we commit ourselves to the Lord and stand before Him, the more we stand together with one another and the more power we discover to understand each other, to recognise each other as human beings, as brothers and sisters.   In this way, in this fellowship with one another, we are building the foundations for humanity and making it possible.

Joseph Card Ratzinger/Pope Benedict XVI “Seek that Which is Above”this of course is the innermost meaning of the eucharist - sun reflection - 11 nov 2018

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 4 November – “I am made one with Him, as I am conformed to Him.” – St Bernard

Sunday Reflection – 4 November – Thirty First Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

 “I am made one with Him, as I am conformed to Him.”  St Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153) Doctor of the Church

Saint Bernard teaches, that it is not enough for us to take and eat the Bread from Heaven. We must also offer ourselves to be eaten.   Holy Communion is a wondrous exchange in which we become the bread of Christ.   Listen to Saint Bernard:

“My penitence, my salvation are His food.
I myself am His food.
I am chewed as I am reproved by Him;
I am swallowed by Him as I am taught;
I am digested by Him as I am changed;
I am assimilated as I am transformed;
I am made one with Him, as I am conformed to Him.
He feeds upon us and is fed by us
that we may be the more loosely bound to Him.”

Saint Bernard, ever the poet, uses images of eating and assimilation to describe how Christ unites us to Himself.   Our Lord becomes our food that we might become His.   We need the language of poets and preachers in our approach to the Eucharist.i am made one with him as i am conformed to him - st bernard - 4 nov 2018 sun reflection

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, PAPAL HOMILIES, Pope BENEDICT XVI, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 28 October – Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Sunday Reflection – 28 October – Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Recognise in the bread, that same body that hung on the cross 
and in the chalice, that same blood that gushed from His side.

Saint Augustine (354-430)

Transubstantiation
In the offering that Jesus makes of Himself we find all the novelty of Christian worship. In ancient times men offered in sacrifice to the divinity the animals or first fruits of the earth.   Jesus, instead, offers Himself, His body and His whole existence – He Himself, in person, becomes the sacrifice that the liturgy offers in the Holy Mass.
In fact, with the consecration of the bread and wine they become His true body and blood.
Saint Augustine invited his faithful, not to pause on what appeared to their sight but to go beyond:  “Recognise in the bread — he said — that same body that hung on the cross and in the chalice that same blood that gushed from His side” (Disc. 228 B, 2).
To explain this transformation, theology has coined the word “transubstantiation,” a word that resounded for the first time in this Basilica during the IV Lateran Council, of which in five years will be the 8th centenary.   On that occasion the following expressions were inserted in the profession of faith:  “his body and his blood are truly contained in the sacrament of the altar, under the species of bread and wine, because the bread is transubstantiated into the body and the wine into the blood by divine power” (DS, 802).
Therefore, it is essential to stress, in the itineraries of education of children in the faith, of adolescents and of young people, as well as in “centres of listening” to the Word of God, that in the sacrament of the Eucharist, Christ is truly, really and substantially present.recognise in the bread - st augustine - 28 oct 2018

Sunday
And let us also keep present that the Eucharist, joined to the cross and resurrection of the Lord, has dictated a new structure to our time.

The Risen One was manifested the day after Saturday, the first day of the week, day of the sun and of creation.   From the beginning, Christians have celebrated their encounter with the Risen One, the Eucharist, on this first day, on this new day of the true sun of history, the Risen Christ.

And thus time always begins again with the encounter with the Risen One and this encounter gives content and strength to everyday life.   Because of this, it is very important for us Christians, to follow this new rhythm of time, to meet with the Risen One on Sunday and thus “to take” with us His presence, which transforms us and transforms our time.

Pope Benedict XVI – 17 June 2010from the beginning, Christians have celebrated - pope benedict - 28 oct 2018

Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 14 October – Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Sunday Reflection – 14 October – Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

“And it happened that, while he was with them at table,
he took bread, said the blessing, broke it and gave it to them.
With that their eyes were opened and they recognised him… but he vanished from their sight.”…Luke 24:30-31

“Before Communion you hear about Jesus Christ and you know Him – you are told of His Cross, of His suffering; doubtless you are affected, are even touched with compassion.

But let these same truths be presented to you after Communion.   Oh, how much more deeply your soul is moved!   It cannot hear enough, it understands much more perfectly. Before Communion, you contemplate Jesus outside you, now you contemplate Him within you, with His own eyes!

It is the mystery of Emmaus re-enacted.   When Jesus taught the two disciples along the way, explaining the Scriptures to them, their faith still wavered, though they felt inwardly some mysterious emotion.   But participating in the Fraction of the bread, immediately their eyes were opened and their hearts were like to burst with joy.

The voice of Jesus had not sufficed to reveal His presence to them, they had to feel His Heart, had to be fed with the Bread of understanding!”

St Peter Julian Eymard (1811-1868)

Apostle of the Eucharistluke 24 30-31 - and while he was with them he took the bread - the voice of Jesus had not sufficed - st peter j eymard - 14 oct 2018 sun reflection

Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, PAPAL HOMILIES, Pope BENEDICT XVI, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 7 October – Twenty-seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Sunday Reflection – 7 October – Twenty-seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

The Beating Heart of the Church –

the Eucharistic Heart of Christ.

This is what Pope Benedict XVI said on 10 June 2007:

“Today’s solemnity of Corpus Christi, which was celebrated last Thursday in the Vatican and in other countries, invites us to contemplate the supreme Mystery of our faith – the Most Holy Eucharist, the Real Presence of our Lord Jesus Christ in the Sacrament of the altar.   Every time that the priest renews the Eucharistic Sacrifice, in the prayer of consecration he repeats:  ‘This is my Body…this is my Blood.’   He lends his voice, his hands and his heart to Christ, who wanted to remain with us in order to be the beating Heart of the Church.

But even after the Celebration of the Divine Mysteries the Lord Jesus remains present in the tabernacle.   For this reason, praise is rendered to Him especially through Eucharistic Adoration, as I sought to remind everyone in the recent Apostolic Exhortation Sacramentum Caritatis (see nos. 66-69) following the Synod on this topic.   In fact, there is an intrinsic connection between celebration and adoration.   The Holy Mass is in itself already the greatest act of adoration on the part of the Church.   ‘No one eats this flesh,’ St Augustine wrote, ‘unless he has first adored it’ (Com. on Psalms 98,9; CCL XXXIX, 1385).  Adoration, apart from the Holy Mas, prolongs and intensifies what has taken place in the liturgical celebration and makes it possible, to receive Christ in a real and profound way.”adoration, apart from the holy mass - pope benedict - 7 oct 2018

Posted in Blessed JOHN HENRY Cardinal NEWMAN, EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST, Uncategorized

Sunday Reflection – 30 September – Twenty sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Sunday Reflection – 30 September – Twenty sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

It is remarkable how it was the reservation of the Blessed Sacrament in Catholic churches that more than anything else impressed and moved Blessed John Henry Newman, even more than the Mass itself.

And so it was that the feature of his new religious life as a Catholic that most struck him came as a complete surprise – namely, the reservation of the Blessed Sacrament in Catholic churches.   He wrote in a letter to a close friend, herself about to become a Catholic a few months later:

“We went over not realising those privileges which we have found by going.   I never allowed my mind to dwell on what I might gain of blessedness – but certainly, if I had thought much upon it, I could not have fancied the extreme, ineffable comfort of being in the same house with Him who cured the sick and taught His disciples …

When I have been in Churches abroad, I have religiously abstained from acts of worship, though it was a most soothing comfort to go into them – nor did I know what was going on;  I neither understood nor tried to understand the Mass service – and I did not know, or did not observe, the tabernacle Lamp – but now after tasting of the awful delight of worshipping God in His Temple, how unspeakably cold is the idea of a Temple without that Divine Presence! One is tempted to say what is the meaning, what is the use of it?”

“It is really most wonderful to see this Divine Presence looking out almost into the open streets from the various Churches … I never knew what worship was, as an objective fact, till I entered the Catholic Church.”

“It is such an incomprehensible blessing to have Christ in bodily presence in one’s house, within one’s walls, as swallows up all other privileges …”

i never knew what worship was - bl jh newman - 30 sept 2018 - sunday reflection