Posted in MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY

Feast of Our Lady of Argenteuil and the Seamless Tunic- 12 February

Feast of Our Lady of Argenteuil and the Seanless Tunic  – 12 February

Our Lady of Argenteuil, Paris, built by King Clovis I containing a portion of the Seamless Garment.xOurLadyofArgenteuil.jpg

The Abbot Orsini wrote: “This priory preserves a portion of the seamless garment of Our Lord.”

In about the year 500, Clovis was the King of the Franks but he was not yet a Catholic.   Years passed as his wife Clotilda prayed for her husband to convert, yet always King Clovis demurred.   Then one fateful day Clovis was engaged in a desperate battle, finding himself sorely bested.   At the point of ruin he cried aloud to the Christian God to assist him, promising to forsake his pagan gods if he were granted a miraculous victory.

Looking up to heaven, Clovis cried:

“Jesus Christ, whom Clotilda declares to be the Son of the Living God, who it is said gives aid to the oppressed and victory to those who put their hope in Thee, I beseech the glory of Thy aid!   If Thou shalt grant me victory over these enemies and I test that power which people consecrated to Thy name say they have proved concerning Thee, I will believe in Thee and be baptised in Thy name.   For I have called upon my gods but, as I have proved, they are far removed from my aid.   So I believe that they have no power, for they do not succour those who serve them.   Now I call upon Thee and I long to believe in Thee – all the more that I may escape my enemies!”

God was pleased to answer Clovis’ petition immediately, for no sooner had he prayed than his enemies fled the field.   Clovis won the battle and he was a man of his word. Hating his former error, Clovis converted to the True Faith.

It is related in the Gospels that Christ’s executioners played dice over this tunic. According to legend, that tunic was found in the fourth century by Saint Helena, the mother of Emperor Constantine.   It was then kept at Constantinople until the eighth century.

In the year 800, the Empress Irene of Byzantium offered Charlemagne the Holy Tunic at his coronation as Emperor of the West.   The emperor then gave the relic to the priory of Argenteuil when his daughter, Theodrade, became abbess.holy-tunic-close-up-marc-antoine_mouterde_argenteuil_2016-03-25-3-e1459629490824.jpg

In the year 850 the Normans plundered the village of Argenteuil, including the Basilica of Saint Dennis but the tunic was hidden in a wall before their arrival.   When the abbey was rebuilt in 1003, the relic was restored.   It is venerated until the 16th century when it was partially burned by Huguenots in 1567.

During the French Revolution the Benedictine priory was destroyed and the relic then given to a parish church for safekeeping.   In 1793, a priest found it necessary to cut it into pieces and bury them in his garden to protect them from profanation.   In 1795, after the priests imprisonment had ended, the Holy Tunic appeared again and the different fragments were sewn back together.

The Holy Tunic was displayed again in the nineteenth century and pilgrimages resumed. On the 13 of December in 1983, the parish priest of Saint Dennis discovered the tunic had been stolen.   On 2 February 1984, Father Guyard received a phone call from a stranger promising to return the treasure to the condition that their names would be kept secret. That same evening the tunic, with its case, was found in the Basilica of Saint Dennis.

The last solemn exposition of the tunic took place during the Easter holiday in 2016.   In six days, approximately 80,000 people came to see the tunic.knight-guards-marc-antoine_mouterde_argenteuil_2016-03-25-7-e1459628517884

The Holy Tunic measures nearly 5’ by 3’ in size.   The fibres are wool and of a very regular size.   It is a soft, lightweight fabric and the weaving is uniform and regular with a twisted “Z,” made on a primitive loom.   The tunic is remarkable for a tunic woven manually, as it is made without any seam, including the sleeves.   The dark brown fabric is typical of the clothing in the early centuries of the Christian era.   The fabric was dyed brown, using a method widely in practice at the time by people of modest means.   The construction and dyeing show the tunic to date from the time of Christ.   It is the garment worn by Christ after the Flagellation and along the road to Calvary as He carried His cross.   Christ’s blood and sweat thus impregnate the fabric.    In 1985 a test was done showing the blood was type AB.   Pollen common to Palestine have also been found in the fabric.marc-antoine_mouterde_argenteuil_2016-03-25-2

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Posted in MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY

Feasts of Our Lady and Memorials of the Saints – 12 February

Madonna del Pilerio: is the patron of the city of Cosenza and of the archdiocese of Cosenza-Bisignano.   The Madonna del Pilerio is depicted in an icon dating back to the twelfth century that is found since 1607 in the chapel built specifically within the cathedral of Cosenza , commissioned by Mgr. Giovani Battista Costanzo ( 1591 – 1617 ).   On 10 May 1981, the cathedral of Cosenza was raised to the shrine of Our Lady of Pilerio by the Archbishop Mons. Dino Trabalzini.   The patronal feast of Cosenza is not celebrated on 8 September the feast of Our Lady of Pilerio and date to which the Nativity of the Virgin is recognised but 12 February to remember the devastating earthquake that hit Calabria on that date in 1854.

Official Prayer to the Madonna del Pilerio

Virgin of Pilerio, Mother of the Church,
You are for us Support, Help and Hope.
We thank you and bless you
but above all we love you.
You are our tender Mother,
given to us by Christ on the Cross.
Listen to your children’s prayer.
Do not let us ever turn away from you.
Strengthen our faith in us,
sustain hope, revive charity.
May you praise the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit forever and ever.
Amen
O Madonna del Pilerio, our glorious Patron, pray for usIconamadonnadelpilerio.jpg

Our Lady of Argenteuil, Paris, France:   Cathedral of Our Lady of Argenteuil, Paris, built by King Clovis I (101) containing a portion of the Seamless Garment of Christ.
See today’s main post.

St Alexius of Kiev
St Ammonius of Alexandria
Bl Anthony of Saxony
St Anthony Kauleas
St Benedict of Aniane OSB (747-821)
About St Benedict – https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/02/12/saint-of-the-day-12-february-st-benedict-of-aniane-747-821-the-second-benedict/

Bl Benedict Revelli
St Damian of Africa
St Damian of Rome
St Ethelwald of Lindisfarne
St Eulalia of Barcelona
St Gaudentius of Verona
St Goscelinus of Turin
Bl Gregory of Tragurio
Bl Humbeline of Jully
St Jak Bushati
St Julian of Alexandria
St Julian the Hospitaller
About St Julian: https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/02/12/saint-of-the-day-12-february-st-julian-the-hospitaller/
Bl Ladislaus of Hungary
Bl Ludan
St Meletius of Antioch
St Modestus of Alexandria
St Modestus of Carthage
St Modestus the Deacon
Bl Nicholas of Hungary
St Sedulius
Bl Thomas of Foligno

Martyrs of Albitina – 46 saints:
During the persecutions of Diocletian, troops were sent to the churches of Abitina, North Africa on a Sunday morning; they rounded up everyone who had arrived for Mass and took them all to Carthage for interrogation by pro-consul Anulinus. The 46 who proclaimed their Christianity were executed. We know some of their names and stories. They were tortured to death in 304 in prison at Albitina, North Africa.

Martyred in England:
Bl George Haydock
Bl James Fenn
Bl John Nutter
Bl John Munden
Bl Thomas Hemeford

Martyred in the Spanish Civil War:
Josep Gassol Montseny

Posted in MARIAN PRAYERS, MARIAN QUOTES, MARIAN TITLES, Papa FRANCIS, PAPAL MESSAGES, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY, WORLD DAYS of PRAYER

Message of the Holy Father for the 27th World Day of the Sick – 11 February 2019

Message of the Holy Father

“You received without payment, give without payment” (Mt 10:8)

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

“You received without payment; give without payment” (Mt 10:8).   These are the words spoken by Jesus when sending forth his apostles to spread the Gospel, so that his Kingdom might grow through acts of gratuitous love.

On the XXVII World Day of the Sick, to be solemnly celebrated on 11 February 2019 in Calcutta, India, the Church – as a Mother to all her children, especially the infirm – reminds us that generous gestures like that of the Good Samaritan are the most credible means of evangelisation.   Caring for the sick requires professionalism, tenderness, straightforward and simple gestures freely given, like a caress that makes others feel loved.

Life is a gift from God.   Saint Paul asks: “What do you have that you did not receive?” (1 Cor 4:7).   Precisely because it is a gift, human life cannot be reduced to a personal possession or private property, especially in the light of medical and biotechnological advances that could tempt us to manipulate the “tree of life” (cf. Gen 3:24).

Amid today’s culture of waste and indifference, I would point out that “gift” is the category best suited to challenging today’s individualism and social fragmentation, while at the same time promoting new relationships and means of cooperation between peoples and cultures.   Dialogue – the premise of gift – creates possibilities for human growth and development capable of breaking through established ways of exercising power in society.   “Gift” means more than simply giving presents – it involves the giving of oneself and not simply a transfer of property or objects.   “Gift” differs from gift-giving because it entails the free gift of self and the desire to build a relationship.   It is the acknowledgement of others, which is the basis of society.   “Gift” is a reflection of God’s love, which culminates in the incarnation of the Son and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit.

Each of us is poor, needy and destitute.   When we are born, we require the care of our parents to survive and at every stage of life we remain in some way dependent on the help of others.   We will always be conscious of our limitations, as “creatures”, before other individuals and situations.   A frank acknowledgement of this truth keeps us humble and spurs us to practice solidarity as an essential virtue in life.

Such an acknowledgement leads us to act responsibly to promote a good that is both personal and communal.   Only if we see ourselves, not as a world apart but in a fraternal relationship with others, can we develop a social practice of solidarity aimed at the common good.   We should not be afraid to regard ourselves as needy or reliant on others, because individually and by our own efforts, we cannot overcome our limitations.   So we should not fear, then, to acknowledge those limitations, for God himself, in Jesus, has humbly stooped down to us (cf. Phil 2:8) and continues to do so, in our poverty, He comes to our aid and grants us gifts beyond our imagining.

In light of the solemn celebration in India, I would like to recall, with joy and admiration, the figure of Saint Mother Teresa of Calcutta – a model of charity who made visible God’s love for the poor and sick.   As I noted at her canonisation, “Mother Teresa, in all aspects of her life, was a generous dispenser of divine mercy, making herself available for everyone through her welcome and defence of human life, of those unborn and those abandoned and discarded… She bowed down before those who were spent, left to die on the side of the road, seeing in them their God-given dignity; she made her voice heard before the powers of this world, so that they might recognise their guilt for the crime – the crimes! – of poverty they created.   For Mother Teresa, mercy was the ‘salt’ which gave flavour to her work, it was the ‘light’ that shone in the darkness of the many who no longer had tears to shed for their poverty and suffering.   Her mission to the urban and existential peripheries remains for us today an eloquent witness to God’s closeness to the poorest of the poor” (Homily, 4 September 2016).

Saint Mother Teresa helps us understand that our only criterion of action must be selfless love for every human being, without distinction of language, culture, ethnicity or religion.   Her example continues to guide us by opening up horizons of joy and hope for all those in need of understanding and tender love, and especially for those who suffer.

Generosity inspires and sustains the work of the many volunteers who are so important in health care and who eloquently embody the spirituality of the Good Samaritan.   I express my gratitude and offer my encouragement to all those associations of volunteers committed to the transport and assistance of patients, and all those that organise the donation of blood, tissues and organs.   One particular area in which your presence expresses the Church’s care and concern is that of advocacy for the rights of the sick, especially those affected by pathologies requiring special assistance.   I would also mention the many efforts made to raise awareness and encourage prevention.   Your volunteer work in medical facilities and in homes, which ranges from providing health care to offering spiritual support, is of primary importance.   Countless persons who are ill, alone, elderly or frail in mind or body benefit from these services.   I urge you to continue to be a sign of the Church’s presence in a secularised world.   A volunteer is a good friend with whom one can share personal thoughts and emotions, by their patient listening, volunteers make it possible for the sick to pass from being passive recipients of care to being active participants in a relationship that can restore hope and inspire openness to further treatment.   Volunteer work passes on values, behaviours and ways of living born of a deep desire to be generous.   It is also a means of making health care more humane.

A spirit of generosity ought especially to inspire Catholic healthcare institutions, whether in the more developed or the poorer areas of our world, since they carry out their activity in the light of the Gospel.   Catholic facilities are called to give an example of self-giving, generosity and solidarity in response to the mentality of profit at any price, of giving for the sake of getting and of exploitation over concern for people.

I urge everyone, at every level, to promote the culture of generosity and of gift, which is indispensable for overcoming the culture of profit and waste.   Catholic healthcare institutions must not fall into the trap of simply running a business, they must be concerned with personal care more than profit.   We know that health is relational, dependent on interaction with others and requiring trust, friendship and solidarity.   It is a treasure that can be enjoyed fully, only when it is shared.   The joy of generous giving is a barometer of the health of a Christian.

I entrust all of you to Mary, Salus Infirmorum.   May she help us to share the gifts we have received in the spirit of dialogue and mutual acceptance, to live as brothers and sisters attentive to each other’s needs, to give from a generous heart and to learn the joy of selfless service to others.   With great affection, I assure you of my closeness in prayer, and to all I cordially impart my Apostolic Blessing.

Vatican City, 25 November 2018
Solemnity of our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe.
Francis27th world day of prayer 11 feb 2019 pope francis message.jpg

Posted in MARIAN PRAYERS, MARIAN TITLES, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, PRAYERS of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, St Pope JOHN PAUL, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Thought for the Day – 11 February – Memorial of Our Lady of Lourdes and the 27th World Day of Prayer for the Sick

Thought for the Day – 11 February – Memorial of Our Lady of Lourdes and the 27th World Day of Prayer for the Sick

Each year over 2 million people make their way through the mountainous country of southeastern France to Lourdes.   They come seeking cures, hoping to find answers, believing, and praying.   At Lourdes, people recall the Lady dressed in white, with a blue sash, yellow roses at her feet and a Rosary on her arm—the Blessed Virgin Mary.

On 11 February 1858, Mary appeared to 14-year-old Bernadette Soubirous.   This was the first of 18 visits, many of them with 20,000 people present.   When Bernadette asked the Lady’s identity, she replied, “I am the Immaculate Conception.”   Just four years earlier, the pope had proclaimed it a dogma that Mary was conceived immaculate without original sin.   The Blessed Virgin, through Bernadette, had come to call sinners to a change of heart.   Her message was a request for prayer and penance.   She also instructed Bernadette to tell the priests that a chapel was to be built on the site and processions held.

On 25 February 1858, the Lady told Bernadette to dig in the dirt and drink of the stream. Bernadette began to dig and after several attempts, she was able to find the water to drink.   The water continued to flow from where she had dug with her hands until it was producing over 32,000 gallons of water a day—as it still does.   There have been over 5,000 cures recorded but less than 100 of them have been declared miraculous by the Church.   Most of these have taken place during the blessing with the Blessed Sacrament.

Today we celebrate the feast of Our Lady of Lourdes.   We may never travel to Lourdes and join in the processions but we can know always that we have a Mother to help us and lead us to her Son, Jesus.   And so we pray to her:

Prayer to Our Lady of Lourdes
By St Pope John Paul II (1920-2005)

To Mary, Mother of tender love,
we wish to entrust all those
who are ill in body and soul,
that she may sustain them in hope.
We ask her also to help us to be welcoming
to our sick brothers and sisters.

Hail Mary, poor and humble Woman,
Blessed by the Most High!
Virgin of hope, dawn of a new era,
We join in your song of praise,
to celebrate the Lord’s mercy,
to proclaim the coming of the Kingdom
and the full liberation of humanity.

Hail Mary, lowly handmaid of the Lord,
Glorious Mother of Christ!
Faithful Virgin, holy dwelling-place of the Word,
Teach us to persevere in listening to the Word,
and to be docile to the voice of the Spirit,
attentive to His promptings in the depths of our conscience
and to His manifestations in the events of history.

Hail Mary, Woman of sorrows,
Mother of the living!
Virgin spouse beneath the Cross, the new Eve,
Be our guide along the paths of the world.
Teach us to experience and to spread the love of Christ,
to stand with you before the innumerable crosses
on which your Son is still crucified.

Hail Mary, woman of faith,
First of the disciples!
Virgin Mother of the Church, help us always
to account for the hope that is in us,
with trust in human goodness and the Father’s love.
Teach us to build up the world beginning from within:
in the depths of silence and prayer,
in the joy of fraternal love,
in the unique fruitfulness of the Cross.

Holy Mary, Mother of believers,
Our Lady of Lourdes,
pray for us.
Amenprayer-to-our-lady-of-lourdes-by-st-john-paul-no-2-11-feb-2018 (1).jpg

Our Lady of Lourdes, Pray for Us!ou lady of lourdes pray for us 11 feb 2019.jpg

St Bernadette, Pray for Us!st-bernadette-pray-for-us-11-feb-2018.jpg

Posted in MARIAN QUOTES, MARIAN TITLES, PRAYERS of the SAINTS, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Quote/s of the Day – 11 February

Quote/s of the Day – 11 February – Memorial of Our Lady of Lourdes and the 27th World Day of Prayer for the Sick and the Memorial of St Caedmon (Died c 680)

“I am the Immaculate Conception.”

Our Lady of Lourdes to St Bernadette
25 March 1858i am the imm conception 11 feb 2019.jpg

Let us now praise
the Guardian of the Kingdom of Heaven
and the might of the Creator
and the thought of His Mind,
glorious Father of men,
for He, Lord Eternal,
did frame the beginning
of every marvellous thing.
He first made the heavens
as a roof for the children of men,
God, the Creator!
Then the mid-earth did the eternal Lord,
the Guardian of men,
therewith provide and earth for men,
the Lord God Almighty!

Saint Caedmon

“Hymn of Creation” by St Caedmon, the hymn he learned in his visionhymn of creation by st caedmon 11 feb 2019.jpg

Posted in MARIAN TITLES, MORNING Prayers, Papa FRANCIS, PAPAL MESSAGES, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY, The WORD, WORLD DAYS of PRAYER

One Minute Reflection – 11 February – 27th World Day of Prayer for the Sick

One Minute Reflection – 11 February – Memorial of Our Lady of Lourdes and the 27th World Day of Prayer for the Sick

And wherever he came, in villages, cities, or country,
they laid the sick in the market places
and besought him that they might touch
even the fringe of his garment
and as many as touched it were made well...Mark 6:56and wherever he came - mark 6 56 11 feb 2019 world day of the sick.jpg

REFLECTION – “Only if we see ourselves, not as a world apart but in a fraternal relationship with others, can we develop a social practice of solidarity aimed at the common good.   We should not be afraid to regard ourselves as needy or reliant on others, because individually and by our own efforts, we cannot overcome our limitations.   So we should not fear, then, to acknowledge those limitations, for God himself, in Jesus, has humbly stooped down to us (cf. Phil 2:8) and continues to do so, in our poverty, He comes to our aid and grants us gifts beyond our imagining.”…Pope Francis, Message for the 27th World Day of the Sick27th world day of the sick - only if we see ourselves - pope francis 11 feb 2019.jpg

PRAYER – Grant us, O merciful God, protection in our weakness, that we, who keep the Memorial of the Immaculate Mother of God, may, with the help of her intercession, rise up from our iniquities. Grant, we pray that our lives may be gifts to all those who cry out in pain. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, One God, forever and ever, amen.our-lady-of-lourdes-pray-for-us-11-feb-2018.jpg

Posted in MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY, WORLD DAYS of PRAYER, YouTube Videos

Our Lady of Lourdes (11 February and 16 July of 1858) – (Optional Memorial)
Our Lady of Lourdes: https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/02/11/the-memorial-of-the-apparitions-of-our-lady-of-lourdes-our-lady-of-the-immaculate-conception-and-the-26th-world-day-of-prayer-for-the-sick/

27th World Day of the Sick *2019
and the 6th Anniversary of the Resignation of Pope Benedict XVI (his health was the major cause of his resignation)

St Ampelius of Africa
St Ardanus of Tournus
Bl Bartholomew of Olmedo
St Caedmon (Died c 680)

St Calocerus of Ravenna
St Castrensis of Capua
St Dativus the Senator
Bl Elizabeth Salviati
St Etchen of Clonfad
St Eutropius of Adrianopolis
St Felix the Senator
St Gobnata
St Pope Gregory II
Bl Gaudencia Benavides Herrero
St Helwisa
St Jonas of Muchon
St Lucius of Adrianople
St Pope Paschal I
St Pedro de Jesús Maldonado-Lucero
St Saturninus of Africa
St Secundus of Puglia
St Severinus of Agaunum
St Soter of Rome
St Theodora the Empress
Bl Tobias Francisco Borrás Román

Guardians of the Holy Scriptures: Also known as –
• Anonymous Martyrs in Africa
• Martyrs of Africa
• Martyrs of Numidia
• Martyrs of the Holy Books
A large number of Christians tortured and murdered in Numidia (part of modern Algeria) during the persecutions of Diocletian, but whose names and individual stories have not survived. They were ordered to surrender their sacred books to be burned. They refused. Martyrs. c 303 in Numidia.

Martyrs of Africa – 5 saints: A group of five Christians who were martyred together; we know nothing else but the names of four of them – Cyriacus, Oecominius, Peleonicus and Zoticus.