Posted in Catholic POETRY, DOCTORS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Thought for the Day – 22 August – The Queenship of Mary

Thought for the Day – 22 August – The Queenship of Mary

As St. Paul suggests in Romans 8:28–30, God has predestined human beings from all eternity to share the image of his Son.   All the more was Mary predestined to be the mother of Jesus. As Jesus was to be king of all creation, Mary, in dependence on Jesus, was to be queen.   All other titles to queenship derive from this eternal intention of God. As Jesus exercised his kingship on earth by serving his Father and his fellow human beings, so did Mary exercise her queenship.   As the glorified Jesus remains with us as our king till the end of time (Matthew 28:20), so does Mary, who was assumed into heaven and crowned queen of heaven and earth.
In the fourth century St Ephrem called Mary “Lady” and “Queen.”   Later Church fathers and doctors continued to use the title.   Hymns of the 11th to 13th centuries address Mary as queen: “Hail, Holy Queen,” “Hail, Queen of Heaven,” “Queen of Heaven.”   The Dominican rosary and the Franciscan crown as well as numerous invocations in Mary’s litany celebrate her queenship.
The feast is a logical follow-up to the Assumption and is now celebrated on the octave day of that feast.   In his 1954 encyclical To the Queen of Heaven, Pius XII points out that Mary deserves the title because she is Mother of God because she is closely associated as the New Eve with Jesus’ redemptive work because of her preeminent perfection and because of her intercessory power. (Fr Don Miller OFM)
“Just as Mary surpassed in grace all others on earth, so also in heaven is her glory unique.   If eye has not seen or ear heard or the human heart conceived what God has prepared for those who love Him (1 Corinthians 2:9), who can express what He has prepared for the woman who gave Him birth and who loved Him, as everyone knows, more than anyone else?” (St Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153) – Doctor of Light – Mellifluous Doctor)

just as mary surpassed in grace - st bernard
Mary Queen of Heaven and Earth Pray for your children!

mary our queen our mother pray for us

Your eyes opened to a new kind of light
Wide pools that gaze with merciful love upon the world
Your sword-pierced heart, immaculate,
Strong-walled as a cathedral
In the holy city of God.

Angels surround your throne
Holy Blessed Virgin,
Mother of God
Star-crowned Queen of heaven and
Queen of angels

We, though sinners, are yours,
Every tribe on earth, every race
Beckoned to enclosure
In deep mantle-folds of grace.

your eyes opened to a new kind of light - queenship of mary - poem

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Posted in CARMELITES, Catholic POETRY, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Quote/s of the Day – 9 August – The Memorial of St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross

Quote/s of the Day – 9 August – The Memorial of St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross

“Today I stood with you beneath the cross
And felt more clearly than I ever did
That you became our Mother only there.

But those whom you have chosen for companions
To stand with you around the eternal throne,

They must stand with you beneath the Cross,
And with the lifeblood of their bitter pains,
Must purchase heavenly glory for those souls
Whom God’s own Son entrusted to their care.”

St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross – Good Friday 1938

today i stood with you beneath the cross - st teresa benedicta

“Our love of neighbour is the measure of our love of God.
For Christians — and not only for them —
no one is a ‘stranger’.
The love of Christ knows no borders”

St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross

our love of neighbour is the measure of our love of god - st teresa benedicta

Posted in Catholic POETRY, IGNATIAN/JESUIT - Reflections, Jesuit Saints and more, MORNING Prayers, SAINT of the DAY

ON THE FEAST OF ST IGNATIUS LOYOLA

Here is a delightful poem for your prayerful contemplation as you remember and celebrate the life of Iñigo López de Loyola.

beautiful iggy!ST IGNATIUS - BEST PIC EVER - MY SNIP

Ignatius
boy-soldier
hoodlum courtier
day-old dreamer
smashed up good in war
convalescent convert
cannonball Christian
crippled companion
with a knack for re-routing attacks

lend us your gift for woundedness
that turns a shot around
then takes its aim at holiness

think of all the saints
you could socialise
if only you hobbled now into Syria
and taught the fallen your techniques

we’ve got sufficient lead and bloodshed
to gild the whole world
with your inside-out-going
alchemy.

Greg Kennedy, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic, in his second year of Theological Studies at Regis College, Toronto. 

Image | Ignatius at Manresa by Montserrat Gudiol (1991). The painting is at Manresa.

POEM ABOUT ST IGNATIUS BY GREG KENNEDY SJ

Posted in Blessed Pope PAUL VI, Catholic POETRY, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 24 July – The Memorial of St Charbel of Makhluf

Thought for the Day – 24 July – The Memorial of St Charbel of Makhluf

In 1950, Father George Webby, a Maronite priest from Scranton, visited Lebanon, took a photo of monks outside the wall of the monastery in which St. Charbel had lived and upon development of the picture saw that St. Charbel miraculously appeared with the monks, according to information provided by St. Anthony’s Church.

StShar02

Art work for holy pictures of this saint is now taken from this photo.   Can you see him? (Hint: smack dab in the middle) click on the picture and then zoom in….

St. Charbel is listed among The Incorruptibles, saints whose bodies were found intact years after burial. His body kept pouring oil and blood until the year before his canonization in 1977.

“…a hermit of the Lebanese mountain is inscribed in the number of the blessed, a new eminent member of monastic sanctity is enriching, by his example and his intercession, the entire Christian people.   May he make us understand, in a world largely fascinated by wealth and comfort, the paramount value of poverty, penance and asceticism, to liberate the soul in its ascent to God…” ……….Pope Paul VI, October 9, 1977

St Charbel Makhluf, Pray for us!

st charbel - pray for us.2.

Watch – “The Saint Charble Song” …it’s special…

A beautiful ode to Saint Charbel, written by J. Michael Thompson- (a Catholic Composer, professor of ecclesiastical chant):

The mountain heights of Lebanon
Resound with songs of joy;
The cedars of that ancient land
Stand tall as we employ
Our hymns of praise and thankfulness
For Sharbel’s saintly ways,
Lived out in strict humility
That guided all his days.

True monk and hermit of the hills,
Saint Maron’s modest son
Scorned wealth and comfort in his life
That heaven’s crown be won.
Of Mary, heaven’s Queen and Gate,
Devoted son was he,
Who cherished all the ancient rites
With great humility.

Fierce lover of the lowly life,
True father of the poor,
As you have done, so help us all
To struggle and endure,
That Christ be praised in ev’ry life,
That riches not ensnare
Or rule us in our daily walk;
That strong may be our prayer!

O Father, Son, and Spirit blest,
One God in persons three,
Receive this hymn we offer now,
And keep your Church e’er free
To follow, as Saint Sharbel did,
Enflamed with love so bright
That we, with eyes fixed firm on Christ,
May vanquish sin’s dark night.

Posted in CARMELITES, CATHOLIC DEVOTIONS of the Month, CATHOLIC Hymns, Catholic POETRY, CATHOLIC-PRAYERS OF THE CHURCH, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the day – 17 July – THE SIXTEEN CARMELITE MARTYRS OF COMPIEGNE

Thought for the day – THE SIXTEEN CARMELITE MARTYRS OF  COMPIEGNE

The French Revolution reveals the titanic struggle between good and evil.   During the terror, over 40,000 Frenchmen were executed just for holding fast to the Catholic Faith and objecting to the worst excesses of the Committee of Public Safety.   The blood lost in the years of 1792-1794 staggers the imagination even in the retelling and the campaign against the Church was as diabolical as it was cruel.

Contemplative religious communities had been among the first targets of the fury of the French Revolution against the Catholic Church.   Less than a year from May 1789 when the Revolution began with the meeting of the Estates-General, these communities had been required by law to disband.   But many of them continued in being, in hiding. Among these were the community of the Carmelite nuns of Compiegne, in northeastern France not far from Paris – the fifty-third convent in France of the Carmelite sisters who followed the reform of  St. Teresa of Avila, founded in 1641, noted throughout its history for fidelity and fervour.   Their convent was raided in August 1790, all the property of the sisters was seized by the government and they were forced to discard their habits and leave their house.   They divided into four groups which found lodging in four different houses all near the same church in Compiegne and for several years they were to a large extent able to continue their religious life in secret.   But the intensified surveillance and searches of the “Great Terror” revealed their secret and in June 1794 most of them were arrested and imprisoned.

They had expected this; indeed, they had prayed for it.   At some time during the summer of 1792, very likely just after the events of August 10 of that year that marked the descent into the true deeps of the Revolution, their prioress, Madeleine Lidoine, whose name in religion was Teresa in honour of the founder of their order, by all accounts a charming  perceptive and highly intelligent woman, had foreseen much of what was to come.   At Easter of 1792, she told her community that, while looking through the archives she had found the account of a dream a Carmelite had in 1693.   In that dream, the Sister saw the whole Community, with the exception of 2 or 3 Sisters, in glory and called to follow the Lamb. In the mind of the Prioress, this mean martyrdom and might well be a prophetic announcement of their fate.

Mother Teresa had said to her sisters: “Having meditated much on this subject, I have thought of making an act of consecration by which the Community would offer itself as a sacrifice to appease the anger of God, so that the divine peace of His Dear Son would be brought into the world, returned to the Church and the state.”   The sisters discussed her proposal and all agreed to it but the two oldest, who were hesitant.   But when the news of the September massacres came, mingling glorious martyrdom with apostasy, these two sisters made their choice, joining their commitment to that of the rest of the community.   All made their offering; it was to be accepted.

After their lodgings were invaded again in June, their devotional objects shattered and their tabernacle trampled underfoot by a Revolutionary who told them that their place of worship should be transformed into a dog kennel, the Carmelite sisters were taken to the Conciergerie prison, where so many of the leading victims of the guillotine had been held during their last days on earth.   There they composed a canticle for their martyrdom, to be sung to the familiar tune of the Marseillaise.   The original still exists, written in pencil and given to one of their fellow prisoners, a lay woman who survived.

On July 17 the sixteen sisters were brought before Fouquier-Tinville.   All cases were now being disposed of within twenty-four hours as Robespierre had wished;  theirs was no exception.   They were charged with having received arms for the émigrés; their prioress, Sister Teresa, answered by holding up a crucifix. “Here are the only arms that we have ever had in our house.”   They were charged with possessing an altar-cloth with designs honouring the old monarchy (perhaps the fleur-de-lis) and were asked  to deny any attachment to the royal family.   Sister Teresa responded: “If that is a crime, we are all guilty of it; you can never tear out of our hearts the attachment for Louis XVI and his family. Your laws cannot prohibit feeling; they cannot extend their empire to the affections of the soul; God alone has the right to judge them.”   They were charged with corresponding with priests forced to leave the country because they would not take the constitutional oath; they freely admitted this.   Finally they were charged with the catch–all indictment by which any serious Catholic in France could be guillotined during the Terror: “fanaticism.”   Sister Henriette, who had been Gabrielle de Croissy, challenged Fouguier-Tinvile to his face:  “Citizen, it is your duty to respond to the request of one condemned;  I call upon you to answer us and to tell us just what you mean by the word ‘fanatic.”   “I mean,” snapped the Public Prosecutor of the Terror, “your attachment to your childish beliefs and your silly religious practices.”   “Let us rejoice, my dear Mother and Sisters, in the joy of the Lord,” said Sister Henriette, “that we shall die for our holy religion, our faith, our confidence in the Holy Roman Catholic Church.”

Give over our hearts to joy, the day of glory has arrived.
Far from us all weakness, seeing the standard come;
We prepare for the victory, we all march to the true conquest,
Under the flag of the dying God we run, we all seek the glory;
Rekindle our ardour, our bodies are the Lord’s,
We climb, we climb the scaffold and give ourselves back to the Victor.

O happiness ever desired for Catholics of France,
To follow the wondrous road
Already marked out so often by the martyrs toward their suffering,
After Jesus with the King, we show our faith to Christians,
We adore a God of justice; as the fervent priest, the constant faithful,
Seal, seal with all their blood faith in the dying God….

Holy Virgin, our model, August queen of martyrs, deign to strengthen our zeal
And purify our desires, protect France even yet, help; us mount to Heaven,
make us feel even in these places, the effects of your power. Sustain your children,
Submissive, obedient, dying, dying with Jesus and in our King believing.

While in prison, they asked and were granted permission to wash their clothes.   As they had only one set of lay clothes, they put on their religious habit and set to the task. Providentially, the revolutionaries picked that “wash day” for their transfer to Paris.   As their clothes were soaking wet, the Carmelites left for Paris wearing their “outlawed” religious habit.   They celebrated the feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in prison, wondering whether they would die that day.

It was only the next day they went to the guillotine.   The journey in the carts took more than an hour.   All the way the Carmelite sisters sang: the “Miserere,” “Salve Regina,” and “Te Deum.”   Beholding them, a total silence fell on the raucous, brutal crowd, most of them cheapened and hardened by day after day of the spectacle of public slaughter.   At the foot of the towering killing machine, their eyes raised to Heaven, the sisters sang “Veni Creator Spiritus.”   One by one, they renewed their religious vows.   They pardoned their executioners.   One observer cried out: “Look at them and see if they do not have the air of angels!   By my faith, if these women did not all go straight to Paradise, then no one is there!

Sister Teresa, their prioress, requested and obtained permission to go last under the knife.   The youngest, Sister Constance, went first.   She climbed the steps of the guillotine With the air of a queen going to receive her crown,” singing Laudate Dominum omnes gentes, all peoples praise the Lord.”   She placed her head in the position for death without allowing the executioner to touch her.   Each sister followed her example, those remaining singing likewise with each, until only the prioress was left, holding in her hand a small figure of the Blessed Virgin Mary.   The killing of each martyr required about two minutes.   It was about eight o’clock in the evening, still bright at midsummer. During the whole time the profound silence of the crowd about the guillotine endured unbroken.

Two years before when the horror began, the Carmelite community at Compiegne had offered itself as a holocaust, that peace might be restored to France and the Church.   The return of full peace was still twenty-one years in the future.   But the Reign of Terror had only ten days left to run.   Years of war, oppression and persecution were yet to come but the mass official killing in the public squares of Paris was about to end.

The Cross had vanquished the guillotine.

These sixteen holy Carmelite nuns have all been beatified by our Holy Father, the Pope, (Pope St. Pius X, 27 May 1906) which is the last step before canonisation.    Blessed Carmelites of Compiegne, pray for us!

relic of the 16 martyrs of compiegne - pray for us!

Posted in CATHOLIC DEVOTIONS of the Month, Catholic POETRY, DEVOTIO, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, St Pope JOHN PAUL, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Thought for the Day – 12 July

Thought for the Day – 12 July

“Veronica?”

“Bernice Veronica” – both names referring to the Woman who wiped the Face of Jesus, commonly depicted in every Catholic church, at the Sixth Station of the Cross.
Did she exist?   And what does it mean to be “a Veronica?”   The Catholic Church tells us that a veil bearing a miraculous image of the Face of Jesus has existed since the earliest centuries, recorded in history and in art.   About the time this miraculous veil first appeared in Rome, in the Middle Ages, the name “Veronica” referred to the veil itself–“Veronica” meaning “vera” or true, and “icon” meaning image, or even more precisely, “to be present.”   Those who gazed upon the veil bearing the true Face of Jesus stood in God’s presence.   They were turned toward His Face.
Legends sprang up sometime later about a woman named “Veronica,” who was sometimes associated with the woman “Berenice” or “Bernice,” the bleeding woman who touches the hem of Jesus’s garment in the Gospel.
“These pious traditions cannot be documented, but there is no reason why the belief that such an act of compassion did occur should not find expression in the veneration paid to one called Veronica.” —The Catholic Encyclopedia.
Pope St. John Paul II expressed the answer to the question of Veronica most beautifully in his poem,

“Name”

In the crowd walking towards the place

[of the Agony]–

did you open up a gap at some point or were you

[opening it] from the beginning?

And since when? You tell me, Veronica.

Your name was born in the very instant

in which your heart

became an effigy: the effigy of truth.

Your name was born from what you gazed upon.

–Karol Wojtyla

name by karol wojtyla-st john paul

When a soul performs an “act of compassion,” Jesus leaves His image on the “veil” of the soul.   In other words, while contemplating the Face of Jesus in an image, in the Word of God in the Scriptures, in a person made in the image and likeness of God, or above all, in the Eucharist, the soul places itself in the Presence of God.   When we are turned completely toward the Face of God, through a daily face-to-face encounter in prayer–by the power of the Holy Spirit–God gradually transforms the soul into the “True Image” of His Son, Jesus Christ.   As Pope St. John Paul II says, our hearts must become an “effigy of truth,” a “true icon.”   Then our name too will be born from what we gaze upon. It will be “Veronica.”

St Veronica pray for us!

st veronica pray for us.2

Posted in CATHOLIC Hymns, Catholic POETRY, MORNING Prayers, PRAYERS of the SAINTS

Our Morning Offering – 9 July

Our Morning Offering – 9 July

“It Is I: Be Not Afraid”
Blessed John Henry Newman (1801–1890)

WHEN I sink down in gloom or fear,
Hope blighted or delayed,
Thy whisper, Lord, my heart shall cheer,
“’Tis I: be not afraid!”

Or, startled at some sudden blow,
If fretful thoughts I feel,
“Fear not, it is but I!” shall flow,
As balm my wound to heal.

Nor will I quit Thy way, though foes
Some onward pass defend;
From each rough voice the watchword goes,
“Be not afraid!… a friend!”

And O! when judgment’s trumpet clear
Awakes me from the grave,
Still in its echo may I hear,
“’Tis Christ! He comes to save.”

it is I - be not afraid - bl john henry newman