Posted in CARMELITES, CATHOLIC DEVOTIONS of the Month, MARIAN DEVOTIONS, MARIAN PRAYERS, MARIAN QUOTES, MARIAN TITLES, MORNING Prayers, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Our Morning Offering – 16 May “Mary’s Month!” – Wednesday of the Seventh Week of Eastertide and the memorial of St Simon Stock (1165-1265)

Our Morning Offering – 16 May “Mary’s Month!” – Wednesday of the Seventh Week of Eastertide and the memorial of St Simon Stock (1165-1265)

Carmel’s Flower
By St Simon Stock (1165-1265)

Carmel’s Flower,
Vine ever blossoming,
Heaven’s splendour!
Virgin who bore a child.
No one is like thee.
Mother gentle and kind.
Yet never touched by man!
To Carmelites give thou the privilege.
Help us Star of the Sea.carmel's flower - st simon stock - 16 may 2018

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Posted in CARMELITES, DEVOTIO, MARIAN DEVOTIONS, MARIAN TITLES, MORNING Prayers, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Saint of the Day – 16 May – St Simon Stock (1165-1265)

Saint of the Day – 16 May – St Simon Stock (1165-1265) Religious Monk, Visionary, Mystic, Marian devotee, early prior general of the Carmelite religious order.   Born c 1165 in Aylesford, County Kent, England – died on 16 May 1265 in the Carmelite monastery at Bordeaux, France of natural causes while on a visit.    Patronage – Bordeaux, France.

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Simon was born in Aylesford, England, to one of the most well-known and respected Christian families in the County of Kent.   While still an infant, he was chosen by the Blessed Mother for her own, with his parents and others hearing him recite the Angelic Salutation of the Archangel Gabriel, long before he had learned to speak.   Prodigious as a child, he learned and memorised the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin before he was able to read, reciting it on a daily basis.   He was observed to read the Holy Scripture, kneeling in his room, by the age of six.

At the age of twelve, Simon left home, living as a hermit in the hollowed trunk of a large oak tree, earning him the name Simon “Stock.”   There he triumphed over the demon, as he would later tell his religious, only by the assistance of the Most Holy Virgin.   While living as a hermit, he drank only water and ate only herbs, roots and wild apples. Eventually, after eight years of solitude, Simon felt called back to communion with others and joined the Carmelite Order.   He finished his studies at Oxford and later (in 1215) was appointed Vicar General of the Order.

Saint Simon worked tirelessly to spread the Carmelite Order throughout Europe, founding many communities in university towns such as Cambridge, Oxford, Paris and Bologna.   He was responsible for the revision of the Rules of the Order, leading the community from lives as hermits to those of mendicant friars.   Known for his deep devotion to Our Blessed mother, as well as for the spiritual gifts of miracles and prophecy, Simon was elected as the sixth Superior General of the Carmelites at age 82.   He continued to govern the order for twenty years, demonstrating holiness, vision and prudence.

During his tenure as Superior General, Simon was graced with a visitation from the Blessed Mother, to whom he was so devoted.   Radiantly surrounded by a multitude of Angels, Our Lady of Mount Carmel appeared to him as he knelt in prayer at Aylesford, England.   Presenting to him the Carmelite Brown Scapular, she made Her Promise of unparalleled generosity to him, his spiritual children and to all those who wished to consecrate themselves to her by this special sign: Her words were:

“Receive, my beloved son, this scapular of your Order.   It is the special sign of my favour, which I have obtained for you and for your children of Mount Carmel.   He who dies clothed with this habit shall be preserved from eternal fire.   It is the badge of salvation, a shield in time of danger and a pledge of special peace and protection.”

The scapular (from the Latin, scapular, meaning “shoulder blade”) consists of two pieces of cloth, one worn on the chest and the other on the back, which were connected by straps or strings passing over the shoulders.   In certain Orders, monks and nuns wear scapulars that reach from the shoulders almost to the ground as outer garments.   Lay persons usually wear scapulars underneath their clothing, consisting of two pieces of material only a few inches square.   Although the scapular may be worn by any Catholic, even an infant, proper investiture must be done by a priest.   Subsequently, the scapular must be worn in the proper manner, the individual forfeiting its holy benefits if neglectful or careless.

Saint Simon Stock died on 16 May 1265, at the age of 100 and was buried in the cathedral of Bordeaux, where he was visiting at the time of his death.   The Saint’s bones are still preserved in a cathedral in Bordeaux;  a tibia was brought to England in the 1860s for the Carmelite church in Kensington, a part of the skull was enshrined at Aylesford in 1950.   St Simon was never formally Canonised but he has been venerated by the Carmelites since at least 1564 and the Vatican has approved the Carmelite celebration of his feast.

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Pietro Novelli, Our Lady of Mount Carmel and Carmelite Saints (Simon Stock (standing), Angelus of Jerusalem (kneeling), Mary Magdalene de’Pazzi, Teresa of Avila), 1641 (Museo Diocesano, Palermo.)

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Devotion to the Brown Scapular remains widespread and recommended by the Catholic Church.   The Carmelites continue to find meaning in the traditional story and iconography of Saint Simon Stock receiving the scapular, particularly as reflecting their filial relationship with Mary.   When St Pope John Paul II addressed the Carmelite family in 2001 on the occasion of the 750th anniversary of the bestowal of the Scapular, he said:

“Over time, this rich Marian heritage of Carmel, has become, through the spread of the Holy Scapular devotion, a treasure for the whole Church.   By its simplicity, its anthropological value and its relationship to Mary’s role, in regard to the Church and humanity, this devotion was so deeply and widely accepted, by the People of God, that it came to be expressed, in the memorial of 16 July on the liturgical calendar, of the universal Church, “the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.”

Posted in ADVENT, CARMELITES, DOCTORS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, SAINT of the DAY, The HOLY CROSS

Thought for the Day – 14 December – The Memorial of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church

Thought for the Day – 14 December – The Memorial of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church

In his life and writings, John of the Cross has a crucial word for us today.   We tend to be rich, soft, comfortable.   We shrink even from words like self-denial, mortification, purification, asceticism, discipline.   We run from the cross.   John’s message—like the gospel—is loud and clear:   Don’t—if you really want to live! (Fr Don Miller OFM)

St John of the Cross – pray for us!ST J OF THE CROSS - PRAY FOR US - 14 DEC 2017

Posted in ADVENT, CARMELITES, DOCTORS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, POETRY, PRAYERS of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

‘Song of the soul that is glad to know God by faith’

‘Song of the soul that is glad to know God by faith’

14 December – The Memorial of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church

There have been a number of translations into English of the works of St John of the Cross.   One of the translations which has been considered one of the best is that by the Anglo-South African convert poet Roy Campbell (2 October 1901 – 22 April 1957).

In October 2009, Roger Scruton wrote about Roy Campbell in his article “A Dark Horse” published in The American Spectator. He was hated by the English “left establishment” especially because of his position on The Spanish Civil War.

The Wikipedia entry says of Roy Campbell that he “was considered by T. S. Eliot, Edith Sitwell and Dylan Thomas to have been one of the best poets of the period between the First and Second World wars but he is seldom found in anthologies today.”

Campbell’s translations of the poetry by St John of the Cross were lavishly praised by Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges

For more about Campbell`s work, R J Dent has published an essay on Roy Campbell and his work entitled: Violence and exquisite beauty – the aesthetics of Roy Campbell.

Here is a poem of St John of the Cross with the translations by the late Roy Campbell.

‘Song of the soul that is glad to know God by faith’

How well I know that fountain’s rushing flow
Although by night

Its deathless spring is hidden. Even so
Full well I guess from whence its source flow
Though it be night.

Its origin (since it has none) none knows:
But that all origin from it arose
Although by night.

I know there is no other thing so fair
And earth and heaven drink refreshment there
Although by night.

Full well I know the depth no man can sound
And that no ford to cross it can be found
Though it be night

Its clarity unclouded still shall be:
Out of it comes the light by which we see
Though it be night.

Flush with its banks the stream so proudly swells;
I know it waters nations, heavens, and hells
Though it be night.

The current that is nourished by this source
I know to be omnipotent in force
Although by night.song of the soul that is glad to know god by faith - st j of the cross - 14 dec 2017

After the beatification of St John of the Cross on 25 January 1675, the Carmelite convent of Nuestra Señora de los Remedios near Seville commissioned this life-sized statue from the young Sevillian sculptor, Francisco Antonio Gijón, then only 21.
The figure of the saint holds a quill pen in his right hand and, in the left, a book with a model of a mountain surmounted by a cross, which refers to his mystic commentary, “The Ascent of Mount Carmel.”

Francisco Antonio Gijón (1653–c. 1721) and unknown painter (possibly Domingo Mejías)
Saint John of the Cross
c 1675
Painted and gilded wood
168 cm (66 1/8 in.)

 

Posted in ADVENT, CARMELITES, DOCTORS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on LOVE, SAINT of the DAY, The HOLY CROSS

Quotes of the Day – 14 December – The Memorial of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church

Quotes of the Day – 14 December – The Memorial of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church

“In giving us His Son, His only Word,
He spoke everything to us at once
in this sole Word – and He has no more to say…
because what He spoke before to the prophets in parts,
He has now spoken all at once by giving us
the ALL Who is His Son.”in giving us his son - st john of the cross - 14 dec 2016

“If a man wishes to be sure of the road
he treads on, he must close his eyes
and walk in the dark.”if a man wishes to be sure of the road - st john of the cross - 14 dec 2017

“At the end of your life,
you will be judged by your love.”

St John of the Cross (1542-1591) Doctor of the Churchat the end of your life - st j of the cross = 14 dec 2017

 

Posted in ADVENT, CARMELITES, DOCTORS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES on SUFFERING, SAINT of the DAY, The WORD

One Minute Reflection – 14 December – The Memorial of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church

One Minute Reflection – 14 December – The Memorial of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church

In all truth I tell you, unless a grain of wheat
falls into the earth and dies,
it remains only a single grain;
but if it dies it yields a rich harvest…John 12:24john 12 - 24

REFLECTION – “O you souls who wish to go on with so much safety and consolation, if you knew how pleasing to God is suffering and how much it helps in acquiring other good things, you would never seek consolation in anything; but you would rather look upon it as a great happiness to bear the Cross of the Lord.”…Saint John of the Crosso you souls - st john of the cross - 14 dec 2017

PRAYER – Lord God, You gave St John of the Cross, the grace of complete self-denial and an ardent love for the Cross of Christ. Grant that by following always in the footsteps of Christ and by the prayers of St John of the Cross on our behalf, we may come to the eternal vision of Your glory. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, in unity with the Holy Spirit, one God forever, amen.st john of the cross pray for us - 14 dec 2017

Posted in ADVENT, CARMELITES, DOCTORS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, PRAYERS of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, Uncategorized

Our Morning Offering – 14 December – The Memorial of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church

Our Morning Offering – 14 December – The Memorial of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church

O King of Gentleness
By St John of the Cross

O blessed Jesus,
give me stillness of soul in You.
Let Your mighty calmness reign in me.
Rule me, O King of Gentleness,
King of Peace.o king of gentleness - o blessed jesus give me - st john of the cross - 14 dec 2017

Posted in ADVENT, ART DEI, CARMELITES, MORNING Prayers, ON the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The HOLY CROSS

Christ of Saint John of the Cross

Christ of Saint John of the Cross is a painting by Salvador Dalí made in 1951.   maxresdefault

It depicts Jesus Christ on the cross in a darkened sky floating over a body of water complete with a boat and fishermen.   Although it is a depiction of the Crucifixion, it is devoid of nails, blood and a crown of thorns, because, according to Dalí, he was convinced by a dream that these features would mar his depiction of Christ.   Also in a dream, the importance of depicting Christ in the extreme angle evident in the painting was revealed to him.

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It is known by it’s Title because its design is based on a drawing by the 16th-century Spanish friar, today’s saint and a Doctor of the Church, St Jon of the Cross.   The composition of Christ is also based on a triangle and circle (the triangle is formed by Christ’s arms;  the circle is formed by Christ’s head).  The triangle, since it has three sides, can be seen as a reference to the Trinity and the  circle represents Unity.    Below is the drawing by St John of the Cross.drawing-by-st-john-of-the-cross

On the bottom of his studies for the painting, Dalí explained its inspiration:   “In the first place, in 1950, I had a ‘cosmic dream’ in which I saw this image in colour and which in my dream represented the ‘nucleus of the atom.’   This nucleus later took on a metaphysical sense;  I considered it ‘the very unity of the universe,’  the Christ!”

In order to create the figure of Christ, Dalí had Hollywood stuntman Russell Saunders suspended from an overhead gantry, so he could see how the body would appear from the desired angle and also envisage the pull of gravity on the human body.   The depicted body of water is the bay of Port Lligat, Dalí’s residence at the time of the painting.Salvador Dalí painting St. John of the Cross

Posted in ADVENT, CARMELITES, CONTEMPLATIVE Prayer, DOCTORS of the Church, SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 14 December – (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church

Saint of the Day – 14 December – (1542-1591) Doctor of the Church – Carmelite monk and Priest, Religious Founder, Writer, Poet, Mystic, Apostle of Contemplative Prayer.   Also known as • Doctor of Mystical Theology • John della Croce • John de la Croix • John de la Cruz.   Patronages – • contemplative life, contemplatives• mystical theology, mystics• Spanish poets• World Youth Day 2011• Segovia, Spain• Ta’ Xbiex, Malta.   Attributes – eagle, Crucifix, Cross, Carmelite habit.    John of the Cross is known for his writings.   Both his poetry and his studies on the growth of the soul are considered the summit of mystical Spanish literature and one of the peaks of all Spanish literature.   He was canonised as a saint in 1726 by Pope Benedict XIII.   He is one of the thirty-six Doctors of the Church, added by Pope Pius XI in 1926.   His works are • Ascent of Mount Carmel• Dark Night of the Soul, Book 1 • Dark Night of the Soul, Book 2 • A Spiritual Canticle of the Soul and the Bridegroom Christ.st john of the cross - infost john cross LARGE

St John was born Juan de Yepes y Álvarez into a converso family (descendents of Jewish converts to Christianity) in Fontiveros, near Ávila, a town of around 2,000 people.  John’s father had been disowned by his wealthy Spanish family when he married a poor weaver rather than a woman of equal economic status.   Living in poverty proved to be too much for him and he died shortly after John was born.   John spent much of his youth in an orphanage, where he was clothed, fed and given an elementary education.   At the age of 17, he found a job in a hospital and was accepted into a Jesuit college.   In 1563 he entered the Carmelite Order.   Eventually he enrolled in another university, where he did so well that he was asked to teach a class and to help settle disputes.

Ordained a Carmelite priest in 1567 at age 25, John met Teresa of Avila and, like her, vowed himself to the primitive Rule of the Carmelites.   As partner with Teresa and in his own right, John engaged in the work of reform and came to experience the price of reform:  increasing opposition, misunderstanding, persecution, imprisonment.    John was caught up in a misunderstanding and imprisoned at Toledo, Spain.   During those months of darkness in that little cell, John could have become bitter, revengeful, or filled with despair.   But instead, he kept himself open to God’s action, for no prison could separate him from God’s all-embracing love.   During this time he had many beautiful experiences and encounters with God in prayer.   He came to know the cross acutely—to experience the dying of Jesus—as he sat month after month in his dark, damp, narrow cell with only his God.Zurbarán_St._John_of_the_Cross. - large

Yet, the paradox!   In this dying of imprisonment John came to life, uttering poetry.   In the darkness of the dungeon, John’s spirit came into the Light.   There are many mystics, many poets-  John is unique as mystic-poet, expressing in his prison-cross the ecstasy of mystical union with God in the Spiritual Canticle.the blessed St John of the Cross

 

But as agony leads to ecstasy, so John had his Ascent to Mt Carmel, as he named it in his prose masterpiece.   As man-Christian-Carmelite, he experienced in himself this purifying ascent;  as spiritual director, he sensed it in others;  as psychologist-theologian, he described and analysed it in his prose writings.   His prose works are outstanding in underscoring the cost of discipleship, the path of union with God:  rigorous discipline, abandonment, purification.   Uniquely and strongly John underlines the gospel paradox: The cross leads to resurrection, agony to ecstasy, darkness to light, abandonment to possession, denial to self to union with God.   If you want to save your life, you must lose it.   John is truly “of the Cross.”   He died at 49—a life short, but full.    AND his reforms of the “Discalced” Carmelites revitalised the Order.   He was proclaimed a Doctor of the Church by Pope Pius XI on 24 August 1926.

496px-diego_de_sanabria_-_saint_john_of_the_cross_-_google_art_project
Diego de Sanabria – Saint John of the Cross
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Image above – El Greco‘s landscape of Toledo depicts the priory in which John was held captive, just below the old Muslim alcázar and perched on the banks of the Tajo on high cliffs
Posted in CARMELITES, DOCTORS of the Church, DOMINICAN, EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Quote/s of the Day – 15 November – The Memorials of St Albert the Great (1200-1280) Doctor of the Church and St Raphael Kalinowski (1835-1907)

Quote/s of the Day – 15 November – The Memorials of St Albert the Great (1200-1280) Doctor of the Church and St Raphael Kalinowski (1835-1907)

“Nor could He have commanded anything more lovable,
for this sacrament produces love and union.
It is characteristic of the greatest love to give itself as food.
“Had not the men of my text exclaimed:
‘ Who will feed us with his flesh to satisfy our hunger?’
as if to say: ‘I have loved them and they have loved me
so much that I desire to be within them
and they wish to receive me so that the,
may become my members.’
There is no more intimate or more natural means
for them to be united to me and I to them.
Nor could He have commanded anything
which is more like eternal life.
Eternal life flows from this sacrament
because God with all sweetness
pours Himself out upon the blessed.”

St Albert the Great (1200-1280) Doctor of the Church

“Our Redeemer ever present in the most Blessed Sacrament,
extends His hands to everyone.
He opens His heart and says, ‘Come to Me, all of you.'”

St Raphael Kalinowski (1835-1907)our redeemer ever present - st raphael kalinowski - 15 nov 2017