Posted in LENT, MORNING Prayers

LENTEN REFLECTION – Friday of the First Week of Lent – 10 MARCH

LENTEN REFLECTION – Friday of the First Week of Lent – 10 MARCH

LENTEN REFLECTION FRIDAY 10 MARCH

Let us mortify our curiosity

Blessed John Henry Newman

For example, in respect to curiosity.   What a deal of time is lost, to say nothing else, in this day by curiosity, about things which in no ways concern us.   I am not speaking against interest in the news of the day altogether, for the course of the world must ever be interesting to a Christian from its bearing upon the fortunes of the church but I speak of vain curiosity, love of scandal, love of idle tales, curious prying into the private history of people, curiosity about trials and offences, and personal matters, nay often what is much worse than this, curiosity into sin. What strange diseased curiosity is sometimes felt about the history of murders and of the malefactors themselves! Worse still, it is shocking to say, but there is so much evil curiosity to know about deeds of darkness, of which the Apostle [Paul] says that it is shameful to speak.   Many a person, who has no intention of doing the like, from an evil curiosity reads what he ought not to read.   This is in one shape or other very much the sin of boys and they suffer for it.   The knowledge of what is evil is the first step in their case to the commission of it.   Hence this is the way in which we are called upon, with this Lent we now begin, to mortify ourselves.   Let us mortify our curiosity.

LET US MORTIFY OUR CURIOSITY

 

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Posted in IGNATIAN/JESUIT - Reflections, Jesuit Saints and more, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the day – 10 March

Thought for the day – 10 March

“Ogilvie typifies what can be overlooked when we reflect the Creed, in the Creed when we say, ‘suffered under Pontius Pilate.’   In other words, Ogilvie typifies the perennial struggle of the Church with the state.   It was a civil official who condemned Christ and it is the state over the centuries, which in Augustine’s language, has become the arm of the enemies of God that gave the Church her first martyrs for 300 years and has been placing such a heavy burden on those who wish to remain faithful to Christ.   The conflict of Church and state is the final feature of John Ogilvie’s spirituality as a martyr.

Let us ask St. John Ogilvie to obtain, especially for the leaders in the Church today, something of the courage he had to be willing to proclaim the true faith even at the price of their blood.   St. John Ogilvie, pray for us.

In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.”

BY VENERABLE SERVANT OF GOD JOHN A HARDON SJ

ST JOHN OGILVIE SJ-PRAY FOR US 3

Posted in IGNATIAN/JESUIT - Reflections, Jesuit Saints and more, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The HOLY ROSARY/ROSARY CRUSADE

Quote/s of the Day – 10 March

Quote/s of the Day – 10 March

“In all that concerns the king, I will be slavishly obedient; if any attack his temporal power, I will shed my last drop of blood for him.
But in the things of spiritual jurisdiction which a king unjustly seizes I cannot and must not obey.”
~~ St John Ogilvie at his trial

“willingly and joyfully pour forth even a hundred lives. Snatch away that one
which I have from me and make no delay about it, but my religion you will never snatch
away from me!”

“If there be here any hidden Catholics, let them pray for me but the prayers of heretics I will not have.”— Saint John Ogilvie at his execution

“At last conscience won the day.  I became a Catholic;
I abandoned Calvinism – and this happy change I attribute to the martyr’s beads and to no other cause those beads which, if I had them now, gold could not tempt me to part with and if gold could purchase them, I should not spare it.” ~~~ Baron John ab Eckersdorff 

(St. John Ogilvie was executed by hanging on March 10, 1615.
A few moments before his hanging, St. John threw his Rosary into the crowd where it
hit Baron John ab Eckersdorff a Calvinist nobleman on the chest – he later converted to
Catholicism, attributing his conversion to witnessing the martyrdom and St. John’s
rosary.)

IF THERE BE ANY HIDDEN-STJOHNOGILVIEAT LAST CONSCIENCE-STJOHN OGILVIE

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, IGNATIAN/JESUIT - Reflections, Jesuit Saints and more, LENT, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The WORD

One Minute Reflection – 10 March

One Minute Reflection – 10 March

We are ….. heirs of God, heirs of Christ, if only we suffer with him so as to be glorified with him……..Romans 8:17

REFLECTION – If we suffer with Christ, we will be glorified with Him.   The fulfilment of the promised happiness is certain for those who share in the Lord’s Passion……St Pope Leo the Great

PRAYER – Grant me Your grace to overcome my natural fear of suffering Lord.   Strengthen me to bear my sufferings in union with Your sacred Passion, for the salvation of the world.  St John Ogilvie you are an example to me, please pray that this Lenten time will assist us all in overcoming our fear of sharing in the Passion of our God. Amen

ROMANS 8-17IF WE SUFFER WITH CHRIST-STLEOTHEGREATST JOHN OGILVIE PRAY FOR US

Posted in LENT, MORNING Prayers

Our Morning Offering – 10 March

Our Morning Offering – 10 March

The First Week of Lent
Friday

Creator of my Life,
renew me – bring me to new life in You.
Touch me and make me feel whole again.
Help me to see Your love
in the passion, death and resurrection of Your son.
Help me to observe Lent
in a way that allows me to celebrate that love.
Prepare me for these weeks of Lent
as I feel both deep sorrow for my sins
and awareness of Your undying love for me
me, who deserves it not.
Amen

morning prayer-friday 1st week

Posted in IGNATIAN/JESUIT - Reflections, Jesuit Saints and more, SAINT of the DAY, The HOLY ROSARY/ROSARY CRUSADE

St John Ogilvie SJ – 10 March

Blessed Memorial of St John Ogilvie SJ – 10 March

Although the judge had tried to pin the crime of treason on him, Ogilvie forced him to assert that it was for his Catholic Faith that he was being killed, rather than for treason, which Protestant history alleges.    Just as with Saint Thomas More, the heroic Jesuit protested his allegiance to the King saying that he was the King’s loyal subject but God’s servant first.    Again, as it was with Thomas More, the executioner begged the martyr’s forgiveness, which he paternally gave.

There were many brave Catholics who came to the execution site to support the saint with prayers and with shouts.   They were fearless.  John said onthe scaffold “If there be here any hidden Catholics, let them pray for me but the prayers of heretics I will not have.”   Then something spontaneous happened, by divine intervention and inspiration.   Just before they tied his hands on the scaffold the saint quickly pulled out his rosary and tossed it to the crowd as a token of farewell.   There was a Protestant Baron, a traveler, who happened to be in the crowd and the rosary bounced off his chest.   The man tried to reach down for the beads but was beaten to them by the surrounding faithful anxious to get such a relic.

This episode of the Protestant gentleman in the crowd was recounted in the records of the trial of the saint because he, the Baron John ab Eckersdorff, was converted by means of the rosary of our Jesuit martyr.   Here is how the event is related, in the words of the Baron, as we have them in Father Daniel Conway’s three part history of Venerable John Ogilvie, published in 1878, in a Glasgow diocesan journal “The Month”:

“His Rosary struck the breast of a young noble
man who was on his travels in these kingdoms.
He was a foreigner and a heretic his name, Baron
John ab Eckersdorff.  ” I was on my travels
through England and Scotland as it is the custom
of our nobility being a mere stripling, and not
having the faith. I happened to be in Glasgow the
day Father Ogilvie was led forth to the gallows,
and it is impossible for me to describe his lofty
bearing in meeting death.   His farewell to the
Catholics was his casting into their midst, from the
scaffold, his rosary beads just before he met his
fate.   That rosary, thrown haphazard, struck me
on the breast in such wise that I could have caught
it in the palm of my hand;  but there was such a
rush and crush of the Catholics to get hold of it,
that unless I wished to run the risk of being trodden
down, I had to cast it from me.   Religion was the
last thing I was then thinking about : it was not in
my mind at all; yet from that moment I had no
rest.   Those rosary beads had left a wound in my
soul; go where I would I had no peace of mind.
Conscience was disturbed, and the thought would
haunt me : why did the martyr’s rosary strike me,
and not another?   For years I asked myself this
question it followed me about everywhere.    At
last conscience won the day.   I became a Catholic;
I abandoned Calvinism – and this happy change I
attribute to the martyr’s beads and to no other
cause those beads which, if I had them now, gold
could not tempt me to part with and if gold could
purchase them, I should not spare it.”

Saint John Ogilvie, pray for us!

ST JOHN OGILVIE PRAY FOR US 2

Posted in IGNATIAN/JESUIT - Reflections, Jesuit Saints and more, SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 10 March – St John Ogilvie

Saint of the Day – 10 March – St John Ogilvie SJ (1579-1615 died aged 36) MARTYR and Jesuit Priest – hanged 10 March 1615 at Glasgow, Scotland but no relic of his body has survived.  He was canonised 0n 17 October 1976 by Pope Paul VI.

saints3-9ogilivie

 

John Ogilvie’s noble Scottish family was partly Catholic and partly Presbyterian. His father raised him as a Calvinist, sending him to the continent to be educated.   There John became interested in the popular debates going on between Catholic and Calvinist scholars.   Confused by the arguments of Catholic scholars whom he sought out, he turned to Scripture.   Two texts particularly struck him: “God wills all men to be saved and come to the knowledge of the truth,” and “Come to me all you who are weary and find life burdensome, and I will refresh you.”

Slowly, John came to see that the Catholic Church could embrace all kinds of people. Among these, he noted, were many martyrs.   He decided to become Catholic and was received into the Church at Louvain, Belgium, in 1596 at the age of 17.

John continued his studies, first with the Benedictines, then as a student at the Jesuit College at Olmutz.   He joined the Jesuits and for the next 10 years underwent their rigorous intellectual and spiritual training. Ordained a priest in France in 1610, he met two Jesuits who had just returned from Scotland after suffering arrest and imprisonment.   They saw little hope for any successful work there in view of the tightening of the penal laws.   But a fire had been lit within John. For the next two and a half years he pleaded to be missioned there.

Sent by his superiors, he secretly entered Scotland posing as a horse trader or a soldier returning from the wars in Europe.   Unable to do significant work among the relatively few Catholics in Scotland, John made his way back to Paris to consult his superiors. Rebuked for having left his assignment in Scotland, he was sent back.   He warmed to the task before him and had some success in making converts and in secretly serving Scottish Catholics.   But he was soon betrayed, arrested and brought before the court. His trial dragged on until he had been without food for 26 hours.   He was imprisoned and deprived of sleep. For eight days and nights he was dragged around, prodded with sharp sticks, his hair pulled out.   Still, he refused to reveal the names of Catholics or to acknowledge the jurisdiction of the king in spiritual affairs. He underwent a second and third trial but held firm.   At his final trial he assured his judges: “In all that concerns the king, I will be slavishly obedient; if any attack his temporal power, I will shed my last drop of blood for him. But in the things of spiritual jurisdiction which a king unjustly seizes I cannot and must not obey.”

Condemned to death as a traitor, he was faithful to the end, even when on the scaffold he was offered his freedom and a fine living if he would deny his faith.   His courage in prison and in his martyrdom was reported throughout Scotland.   This Jesuit loved to laugh. His jokes brightened the dark days of his captivity during which his captors tried to “brainwash” him. “For eight days and nine nights, they kept me awake by using pins, needles and whips.” St. John Ogilvie was executed by hanging on March 10, 1615 and was disembowled.   A few moments before his hanging, St. John threw his Rosary into the crowd where it was caught by Baron John ab Eckersdorff a Calvinist nobleman – who later converted to Catholicism, attributing his conversion to witnessing the martyrdom and St. John’s rosary.

John Ogilvie was canonised in 1976, becoming the first Scottish saint since 1250.